Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Cheesy Jokes and Serious Thoughts for the Garden (These May Bug You)

You know your humorous material is hilarious when the bushes laugh.

These jokes are just too punny.


How do snails fight each other?    They slug it out.


Hello, honey.

You wouldn't say that to my face!


What did the bee say to the flower?

Hello honey.


Here's a cool site for lots of activities:
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/themes/bees.shtml


Why do bees hum? Because they can't remember the words.



What silly jokes....
What is the difference between a fly and a bird?
A bird can fly but a fly can't bird!



To bee, or not to bee...
Two flies are on the porch. Which one is an actor?
(The one on the screen!)










                                                    What do insects learn at school?
                                                                Mothmatics!



Woops, they misspelled it on the bottle and glass.


What do frogs drink?
          Croak a Cola




Frosted glass, please.
















But I'm really such a nice guy.

A rose is a rose, etc.
What do you get if you cross a tarantula and a rose?






                                              

 (I'm not sure, but I wouldn't try smelling it!)





Always jokes about the legs.

I'm already a walkie-talkie-er-walkie flyie
What do you get if you cross a centipede and a parrot?

 (A walkie-talkie!)



Kids love nature, and studies show they do better in life in every way when nature is a big part of their day. Gardening, at home or school, is the best bet for STEM activities, art activities, SEL activities, and relaxation and compelling involvement in an excellent activity that could be a lifelong blessing. Plus, some kids live in food deserts, and learning to grow a laundry basket of potatoes or tub of tomatoes could help their families. So, teachers, get together and start small and let it grow!

Gardening for children 

https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/gardening-for-children 

School Garden Checklist--Let's Move
http://www.letsmove.gov/school-garden-checklist 

School Gardening  
http://www.kidsgardening.org/node/120

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