Saturday, April 4, 2020

Educational Links 4/5/2020



How to Turn on the Part of Your Brain That Controls Motivation



Is It Just Me or Are You Struggling to Get Students to Show Up for Online Classes?


Why The Art of Speaking Should Be Taught Alongside Math and Literacy



7 Guiding Principles For Parents Teaching From Home


Tools to Help Students Follow Their Passions

Temple Grandin Has Some Great Tips to Help Autistic Kids Cope During the Coronavirus Quarantine


6 Reasons to Try a Single-Point Rubric


A format that provides students with personalized feedback and works to keep them from focusing solely on their grade.

Our Daily Agenda --for our Special Education students in quarantine

Our Daily Agenda at Home

Parent/Teacher Surrogate Administered-document your student's work by a handwritten schedule or email on Fridays. The Homeschool teacher can assess the work but the District teacher will need evidence of the work. If teacher sends a packet because you do not have internet access, hold onto the work until the District directs us how to communicate.

Absolutely follow the guidelines for quarantine

Times are approximate.


7:00 am

Get up, get dressed, prepare your breakfast, eat it, brush your teeth, and clean up. Help with morning chores: dishes, feed pets, take out trash, wipe kitchen surfaces (tables, counters, etc.)

8:00 am
HOMEROOM (this has a new meaning) 

Fill these answers in a notebook, or a document on Google Classroom, or an email on Google Classroom.
  • What is today's date? What time is it?
  • What is the weather forecast? What will the temperature be?

  • Check outside-if possible, step just outside. Look at the sky-any clouds? What color is the sky? Listen-hear any birds? What do you hear? Check out the plant life. Are there flowers that smell? Are there bushes or trees that smell? What is is like?
  • Set up for learning work area. Sharpen pencils, get your notebook/device ready and away from distractions. 
8:30 am
ELA and Writing
  • Practice writing your name, alphabet and numeral to 20.
  • Choose a workpage from Google Classroom.
  • Write in your journal. Write about how you
    feel right now, and choose a topic from your list on Google Classroom.
Take a break for exercise-check out the suggestions on Google Classroom. Ask your grown-up how you can help-maybe tidy up your living area, sweep, vacuum.

9:00
Math and Arithmetic
Fill these answers in a notebook, or a document on Google Classroom, or an email on Google Classroom.
  • What time is it? Choose a time related assignment on Google classroom.
  • Money math. Choose a money related assignment on Google Classroom.
  • Calculation. Choose an assignment on Google Classroom to add, subtract,multiply, or divide. 
9:45 am
Nutrition Break
Choose a healthy snack. If there are siblings, help them prepare a healthy snack. Fruit is great! Clean up. Wipe down surfaces. Wash your face and hands. Prepare your work area. Prepare a place to read.

10:00
Reading

Fill these answers in a notebook, or a document on Google Classroom, or an email on Google Classroom.

  • Choose a workpage from Google Classroom.
  • Choose a book, regular or digital, and read for 20 minutes. You can read with a homeschool classmate or teacher.
10:30
Health
Self-check. 
  • When did I last wash, really wash, my hands? My face? Take a bath or shower washing my hair? Are my clothes clean?
  • Is my body acting healthy? Am I sleeping alright at night? Am I eating and digesting alright?
  • How's my attitude? Do I feel like things are going to be alright? Is there a person I can talk to at home about my feelings?
  • Check your personal space-where you work, sleep-get it organized!

11:30
Lunchtime and Recreation
  • Wash your face and hands. Prepare the area to eat, wiping tables and counters.
  • Help prepare lunch. 
  • Choose music to listen to with your homeschool team while you eat. Don't forget our playlists are on Youtube.
  • Eat lunch. Brush your teeth. Clean up. Wipe the table and counters, help tidy floors, pick up clutter, put things aright.
  • Choose a game to play with homeschool classmate, parent, or teacher surrogate. 20 minutes.
  • Free time to do-your-own-thing (within reason.) Listen to music, watch cat videos, play video game--but know you have a time limit!
1:00
Art
Fill these answers in a notebook, or a document on Google Classroom, or an email on Google Classroom.
  • Choose your Art activity from Google Classroom. 
  • If you choose Art History, be ready to write about the artwork and artist your responded to the best.
  • You may choose to do art(drawing, painting, sculpture) on your own; there are youtube tutorials on our Google Classroom. 
  • There are digital field trips to Art Museums. If you do that, write a summary of what you saw at the Museum.
1:45
Careers
  • Edtech-choose one of our three edtech sites (typing club, code.org, timestables, or study.com; Team 1 coolmath) for 30 minutes. You may switch between them.
  • Choose one activity from Google Classroom for Transition.
2:20
Reflect
Finish up your school day
Normally, we would be getting on the bus. Instead, talk with your parent or teacher about how your day went:
  • Were we organized? Can we improved in our process?
  • What did I enjoy learning?
  • What am I curious about-can I choose work or an activity tomorrow about that subject?
  • Be grateful to your teacher and homeschool classmates. Say thank you.
There are directions, guidelines, and helpful information for parents and teacher surrogates on Google Classroom.
You can find workpages for free at 

And, please, if it is safe to take a nice walk and enjoy nature--do that!



Life Too Fiberoptic? Take A Cafe Jazz Break


 MzTeachuh: Life Too Fiberoptic? Take A Cafe Jazz Break: Cinnamon Spice Mocha, anyone? Your Own Rhythm (Cafe Jazz Coffee) - Playing for The Time  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9MNgSd-...

National Poetry Month: Poem #2


The Fall of Icarus by Bruehgal

Landscape with the Fall of Icarus
William Carlos Williams 

According to Brueghel
when Icarus fell
it was spring 
a farmer was ploughing
his field
the whole pageantry 

of the year was
awake tingling
with itself 

sweating in the sun
that melted
the wings' wax 

unsignificantly
off the coast
there was 

a splash quite unnoticed
this was
Icarus drowning 

 William Carlos Williams

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Carlos_Williams

Icarus

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icarus

Jim Henson's The Storyteller Daedalus and Icarus

 http://www.tv.com/shows/jim-hensons-the-storyteller/daedalus-and-icarus-1598028/

  

Friday, April 3, 2020

Educational Links 4/4/2020


How to Use Google Classroom for Remote Teaching

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uUOwyIgzFOU


‘It feels a little hopeless’: Parents of kids with disabilities worry coronavirus quarantine will mean regression



Fifteen Digital Citizenship Resources for K-12





COVID-19 Educator Resources


Remote Teaching Resource Center


Online Assignments: Best Practices for Teachers to Use With Students


Survey: Teachers support school closures, worry about students falling behind



7 Guiding Principles For Parents Teaching From Home


Understanding the “why” behind teaching practices can help parents create meaningful and effective at-home learning opportunities during the pandemic.

Don't Like Poetry? Betcha Do

...don't forget all those Valentine's rhymes!

 You say you don't like poetry--I doubt that. We just have to establish what we mean by poetry.

Yes, you enjoyed a movie that is all poetry.
That come-on line is nothing but poetry.

Romeo + Juliet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romeo_%2B_Juliet 

 

The Cat in the Hat--even my name is poetry.

 

You can't say you never liked Dr. Seuss--what's that--you forgot it was poetry? 

The Cat in the Hat

http://www.seussville.com/books/book_detail.php?isbn=9780394800011 

     

Betting you have quoted poetry, though maybe not all at once.

Tis better to have loved and lost/Than never to have loved at all  Tennyson To err is human; to forgive, divine  Alexander Pope  A thing of beauty is a joy forever  Keats And miles to go before I sleep  Robert Frost Hope springs eternal in the human breast  Alexander Pope To be or not to be: that is the question Shakespeare I know why the caged bird sings Maya Angelou O Romeo, Romeo; wherefore art thou Romeo Shakespeare...there's no joy in Mudville, the mighty Casey has struck out. Thayer

You probably chuckled at the Limerick about the girl from Venus, but I won't print that since this is a family edublog. But this poem  might make you smile, especially noting the poet.

The marriage of poor Kim Kardashian
Was krushed like a kar in a krashian.
Her Kris kried, "Not fair!
Why kan't I keep my share?" 
But Kardashian fell klean outa fashian.
—Salman Rushdie 

Maybe you didn't realize you were accessing poetry during spiritual moments. The Psalms are poems, like the most quoted Psalm 23.
Lena Moore Psalm 23 Quilt ca. 1930 Collection of Janet M. Green "Talking Quilts" American Folk Art Museum
Remember when you were in ninth grade and you kind of liked that wild story with the Greek guy and all the monsters like the Cyclops and the crazy-haired Medusa? 

That was poetry, thanks to Homer, not Simpson. The Odyssey by Homer.
Cyclops AKA Claymation

Achilles AKA Brad Pitt.

 And don't forget Achilles, not the heel. The Illiad (and the story of Troy) was  a poem, too.

 Speaking of Homer Simpson, here is my last evidentiary item. You enjoyed "The Raven: the Simpson's Version." I know you did. Though they did a really Poe job of it. (Ha, English major joke.)

The Raven: The Simpsons Version

http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=251203 

Poetry...you like poetry. Told ya so.

The Raven:The Simpsons Version [117,615 views] 
the
The Raven:The Simpsons Version[117,615 views]

 

National Poetry Month: Poem #1

The Curious Blackbird by Maureen Ida Farley

Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird

Wallace Stevens


I
Among twenty snowy mountains,
The only moving thing
Was the eye of the blackbird.
II
I was of three minds,
Like a tree
In which there are three blackbirds.
III
The blackbird whirled in the autumn winds.
It was a small part of the pantomime.
IV
A man and a woman
Are one.
A man and a woman and a blackbird
Are one.
V
I do not know which to prefer,
The beauty of inflections
Or the beauty of innuendoes,
The blackbird whistling
Or just after.
VI
Icicles filled the long window
With barbaric glass.
The shadow of the blackbird
Crossed it, to and fro.
The mood
Traced in the shadow
An indecipherable cause.
VII
O thin men of Haddam,
Why do you imagine golden birds?
Do you not see how the blackbird
Walks around the feet
Of the women about you?
VIII
I know noble accents
And lucid, inescapable rhythms;
But I know, too,
That the blackbird is involved
In what I know.
IX
When the blackbird flew out of sight,
It marked the edge
Of one of many circles.
X
At the sight of blackbirds
Flying in a green light,
Even the bawds of euphony
Would cry out sharply.
XI
He rode over Connecticut
In a glass coach.
Once, a fear pierced him,
In that he mistook
The shadow of his equipage
For blackbirds.
XII
The river is moving.
The blackbird must be flying.
XIII
It was evening all afternoon.
It was snowing
And it was going to snow.
The blackbird sat
In the cedar-limbs.

Blackbird McCartney
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Man4Xw8Xypo

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Educational Links 4/3/2020

7 Ways to Maintain Relationships During Your School Closure


San Diego Zoo Academy offers eight weeks of free classes


Online and Blended Learning Guide




ONLINE WORKSHOPS


New Strategies in Special Education as Kids Learn From Home


7 keys to effective online learning


High-quality and engaging online learning programs have a number of common characteristics


A Deep Breath, Time to Think--Reverie



Debussy: Rêverie (1890) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79UfWizjGiQ 


The Arts Give You Smarts

5 Reasons Why Arts Education Is Important For EVERYONE


Arts and Smarts


STEM to STEAM: The “Arts” and Its Importance in STEM Education


Does Learning Art, Dance and Music Boost Young Brains?



Arts Across the Curriculum


Art Enhances Brain Function and Well-Being


The arts play an important role in human development, enhancing the growth of cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor pathways. Neuroscience research reveals the impressive impact of arts instruction, such as, music, drawing and physical activity, on students' cognitive, social and emotional development.